produced by chain | 0 replies
Apple clapped back at Spotify's "misleading" complaints that Apple's App Store abuses its power to stifle competition, accusing the music-streaming giant of wanting a free ride to the disadvantage of smaller developers now that it's grown into a powerhouse. "Spotify wouldn't be the business they are today without the App Store ecosystem, but now they're leveraging their scale to avoid...
produced by chain | 0 replies
US Senators Roy Blunt and Brian Schatz want to protect people's facial recognition data and make it much harder to sell now that information is treated as currency. The lawmakers have introduced the bipartisan Commercial Facial Recognition Privacy Act of 2019, which prohibits companies from collecting and resharing face data for identifying or tracking purposes without...
produced by chain | 0 replies
Facebook’s gaming efforts and challenge to Twitch are taking another big leap today, as the social network begins the initial rollout of a dedicated Facebook Gaming tab in the main navigation of Facebook’s app. The goal with the new addition is to help people more easily find games, streamers and gaming groups they follow, as well as discover new content, based on their interests. After...
produced by chain | 0 replies
Updated Windows 7 holdouts have been warned to expect a notification suggesting that perhaps an upgrade might be in order. Matt Barlow, corporate veep for Windows, has promised Windows 7 users are to receive a "courtesy reminder" that support is running out for the venerable OS as 14 January 2020 looms large. Barlow also noted that Office 2010 ends its support run shortly...
produced by chain | 0 replies
A funny thing has happened on the way to 19H1: an Azure OS kernel engineer tweaked Windows 10 to make the operating system considerably more KVM-friendly. Reg reader Waseem drew our attention to a GitHub thread, which consisted mostly of FOSS fans working on the drivers needed to get the Arm version of Windows 10 up and running on a variety of hardware (including Android...
produced by chain | 0 replies
A group of hackers is using a previously undocumented backdoor program designed to interact with attackers over Slack. While abusing legitimate services for malware command-and-control purposes is not a new development, this is the first time researchers have seen Slack, a popular enterprise collaboration tool, being used in this way. [ Keep up with 8 hot cyber security trends (and 4 going...