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About chain

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    Founder Owner Administrator
  • Birthday 01/26/1962

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  • Website URL
    http://chainscriptz.net

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Montreal,Quebec
  • Interests
    scripting and chatting
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  1. Microsoft has confirmed a security flaw affecting Internet Explorer is currently being used by hackers, but that it has no immediate plans to fix. In a late-evening tweet, US-CERT, the division of Homeland Security tasked with reporting on major security flaws, tweeted a link to a security advisory detailing the bug, describing it as “being exploited in the wild.” Microsoft said all supported versions of Windows are affected by the flaw, including Windows 7, which after this week no longer receives security updates. The vulnerability was found in how Internet Explorer handles memory. An attacker could use the flaw to remotely run malicious code on an affected computer, such as tricking a user into opening a malicious website from a search query or a link sent by email. It’s believed to be a similar vulnerability as one disclosed by Mozilla, the maker of the Firefox browser, earlier this week. Both Microsoft and Mozilla credited Qihoo 360, a China-based security research team, with finding flaws under active attack. Earlier in the week, Qihoo 360 reportedly deleted a tweet referencing a similar flaw in Internet Explorer. Neither Qihoo, Microsoft, nor Mozilla said how attackers were exploiting the bug, who the attackers were, or who was being targeted. The U.S. government’s cybersecurity advisory unit also issued a warning about current exploitation. Microsoft told TechCrunch that it was was “aware of limited targeted attacks” and was “working on a fix,” but that it was unlikely to release a patch until its next round of monthly security fixes — scheduled for February 11. Microsoft assigned the bug with a common vulnerability identifier, CVE-2020-0674, but specific details of the bug have yet to be released. When reached, a Microsoft spokesperson did not comment https://techcrunch.com/2020/01/18/internet-explorer-security-flaw/
  2. Reportedly, researchers from WebARX Security have found a serious security flaw in two different WordPress plugins. Considering the extensive userbase of both plugins, the bug potentially made thousands of websites vulnerable to cyber attacks. Stating about the bug in their advisory, the researchers stated that they found an authentication bypass flaw in two plugins, the WP Time Capsule and InfiniteWP Client. Exploiting the flaw could allow an attacker to sign-in to the admin account without a password. According to the researchers, the bug remained exploitable even with a firewall. Attribution link: https://latesthackingnews.com/2020/01/20/critical-bug-in-two-wordpress-plugins-risked-over-320k-websites/
  3. Researchers from Kaspersky have discovered some old malware active in the wild again. Identified as Faketoken, the old Android banking trojan is now back with more malicious functionality. The malware first emerged several years ago and was among the most widespread banking trojans in 2014. At that time, Faketoken meddled with the device-messaging only once to proceed with fraudulent transactions. However, in 2016, it became more sophisticated in stealing money, as it overlaid apps to steal users’ bank account credentials. At the same time, it also served as ransomware by encrypting the device data.  Whereas, in the following year, it emerged whilst impersonating popular e-wallets and mobile banking apps to bluff users. Hijacking Phone For Sending SMS Elaborating on their findings in a blog post, the researchers stated that their ‘Botnet Attack Tracking’ system recently found at least 5000 devices infected with Faketoken. They found all these devices involved in sending text messages. The researchers considered this behavior ‘unusual’ for a banking trojan. Scratching the surface revealed that the typical banking trojan has now emerged as an even more malicious virus. Faketoken now hijacks the victim devices to send messages to premium rate numbers. Whereas, in case of lack of balance, the attackers behind the malware can top up the victim mobile account through their bank account. Such messages will further cost the victim as the researchers found most messages being sent to foreign numbers. While, for now, it is unclear as to how Faketoken is targeting devices. Nonetheless, the usual precautions, which are avoiding downloads from third-party app stores, avoiding URLs received via SMS messages, reviewing app permissions, and empowering devices with robust mobile antivirus tools can help the Android users stay safe.Attribution link: https://latesthackingnews.com/2020/01/20/android-banking-trojan-faketoken-now-also-messages-premium-rate-phone-numbers/
  4. Reportedly, Facebook has announced an update in its login feature. The new feature will now notify users while logging in to third-party apps via Facebook. Facebook believes this change will bring more control to the users on their information. The tech giant has detailed this new feature in a blog post. As revealed, the new feature, called ‘Login Notifications’, generates user alerts while signing-in to third party apps. This notification will give details to the user about the information shared with the app. It will also let the user make any changes to the shared data.Attribution link: https://latesthackingnews.com/2020/01/19/facebook-will-notify-users-when-logging-in-to-third-party-apps/
  5. Last night we experienced approximately 12 hours of downtime between around 18:00 and 06:40 UTC, caused by a prolonged period of internet routing issues which our ISP has attributed to a failed line card in one of their routers. This was our longest period of downtime in many years and we’re very sorry for the disruption it caused. Running a large service which interfaces with the venerable IRC protocol poses a different set of challenges to most modern web services: Firstly, we have to manage a large number of outbound IRC connections while ensuring as few disconnections as possible. Secondly, IRC networks expect our users to connect from a consistent set of IP addresses, and lastly, IRCCloud is subject to a high volume of distributed denial of service (DDoS) attacks. These constraints mean that our outbound connection servers, which actually make your outbound IRC connections, have been hosted for years by a specialist DDoS-resistant hosting service provided by a major ISP. This is a costly part of our infrastructure, and it wouldn’t be economical for us to completely duplicate these servers elsewhere to mitigate against rare situations like the one last night. Switching to another ISP - even if we could find one to provide the required servers at short notice - would involve a long process of getting new IP addresses whitelisted by IRC networks. Our current architecture also restricts us to running our outbound connection servers in relatively close proximity to the rest of our infrastructure (which is hosted on Amazon Web Services). Over the last few months we’ve been working on a significant update of our backend software to remove this restriction - in fact, we started rolling this update out yesterday. These improvements will make it easier for us to investigate other approaches for our outbound connection servers in future, and we’ll certainly be discussing network redundancy with our ISP and future providers. If you’re an IRCCloud subscriber, we’re happy to issue you a month’s refund in compensation for this downtime - drop us an email at team@irccloud.com. Tuesday January 22 2019 • posted by james Bouncer: connect with other clientsToday we’re launching one of our most requested features. Paid subscribers can now use 3rd party IRC clients to connect to the IRCCloud service, just as you would with a traditional bouncer. Open the menu for one of your IRC or Slack connections and choose the “Connect with another client…” option for details on how to connect. For IRC connections, you’ll be prompted to generate a unique server password. Backlog replayNote: backlog replay isn’t currently available for Slack connections Bouncer passwords are shown to you in the following format: bnc:xxxxxxxx… If you’d like the bouncer to replay missed messages whenever you reconnect with your client, you’ll need to change this format to include a clientid of your choosing. This is used to identify and track the messages your client has seen to make sure we only replay undelivered messages. The clientid can be anything, but can’t include spaces. Just make sure to use a different id for each client you use. Once you’ve chosen a clientid, rewrite your password in the following format: bnc@clientid:xxxxxxxx… For example, if your generated password was bnc:abcxyz and you chose laptop as a clientid, you’d connect with the following server password: bnc@laptop:abcxyz SecurityA bouncer password grants full access to the associated network connection, so make sure to keep it safe. You can revoke or regenerate a bouncer password at any time, in case you no longer need it or it becomes compromised. This will also disconnect any client currently using that password. Backlog timestampsThe latest versions of most 3rd party clients support the server-time IRCv3 feature, which the bouncer will use to provide the correct timestamp for backlog replay. However, some clients may need a little coaxing https://blog.irccloud.com
  6. Embedding a Kiwi IRC widget into your websiteEmbedding a Kiwi IRC widget on your website can be a great way to bring your community together or host an online event. No more linking to a long kiwirc.com address - you can keep your community and users on your own website while taking advantage of the well tested kiwiirc.com servers and functionality. At the very least you must know where you want your users to connect to. This will be an IRC network and a channel name. If you don't have either of these, feel free to use irc.kiwiirc.com as the network and any channel name of your choosing (letters and numbers only but starting with a # symbol). https://kiwiirc.com/embedding
  7. we're back in 2019 with a maintenance release for the 0.13 cycle, Quassel 0.13.1. Besides a handful of fixes and improvements over the previous release, 0.13.1 fixes a particularly annoying issue with 0.13.0 on Qt4-based systems where backlog messages would not all be fetched. I'd like to thank Janne "justJanne" Koschinski and Shane "digitalcircuit" Synan in particular for finding the cause for this problem, as well as implementing and testing the fix! So if you happen to run Quassel 0.13.0 on a system or distro still using Qt4, be sure to upgrade (or ask your friendly distro maintainers to do so), otherwise your chat history may be spotty... Official 0.13.0 builds for Windows and OSX already use Qt5, so they're not affected. Also any recent distro release should have done the migration already, as Qt5 has been out for quite some time. Quassel 0.13.1 also makes database schema upgrades more robust by making them resumable, and allows to configure the listen addresses for the built-in identd. Please see the ChangeLog for a full list of changes. As always, you can find the sources, as well as precompiled binaries for Windows and OSX on the downloads page. Cheers,
  8. chain

    ChainScriptz Blog

    Just to inform people we at chainscriptz have added a blog from which i will rant about things and add things and explain things. This blog will be a way to let steam out and for others to comment or rebutle.
  9. So Im going to Rant about people and chat server's I've been hearing a lot of complaint pertaing to Buzzen staff and how there running it. I can remember a time when buzzen was always being flooded or being attacked. there were so many issues when Buzzen first opened and how things gradually changed over the times. There was a point in my life where i did care about the chat servers and how they were being controlled by staff and after awhile i also became staff and saw things and saw ppl being fired due to just being control freaks and banning people for stupid shit. then came the huge move where err0r,Eyecu,Fiesty,me became dedicated to the server and started working and bringing in new staff with err0r developing new clinets for us and constructing the server with eyecu to be more secure and less flooding. Also danger was a help in finding loop holes and assisting. it was great and the server became more and more popular. But then Duke realized he could sell his chat network to others and with the help of err0r bring in new servers. so as you can see Buzzen has a huge history with scripters. So now this brings me to the question is Buzzen mistreating some chatters or are theses chatters finally getting what they deserve. Ive know Eyecu for quite some years and I know that no matter what people say I believe not any woman would come between him and his knowledge of what is right and what is wrong. Now if its another staff member well thats a different story and im sure if its brought to head staffs attention it will be looked into and then dealt with in the proper manner!! This is my opinion only.
  10. Here you'll find IT related howtos, code snippets, random rants, and probably horribly outdated information, written by a guy born in 1964 who likes IT&tech stuff, Scripting, Chat Servers, and Music you can bang your head to, and Dogs. Enjoy your stay!
  11. chain

    New Look ChainScriptz

    Wes & I have decided to update the site and make it a little more easy on the eyes. As we are getting older espicially me LOL We hope you will like the New Theme.
  12. Two men have been arrested after Britain’s National Crime Agency and its international pals claimed the takedown of breached credentials-reselling website WeLeakInfo. In a collaboration between British, Northern Irish, German, US and Dutch police agencies WeLeakInfo was taken offline yesterday with two 22-year-olds alleged to be linked to its operation being arrested at the same time. The NCA began looking closely at the site, which is said to have offered paid access to around 12 billion items of personal data, in August 2019. In a statement the agency alleged that credentials from the site were being used in cyber attacks affecting Britain, Germany and America. The two arrested men were said, by NCA investigators, to have made £200,000 from running the site. One hailed from Fintona, Fermanagh, Northern Ireland, while the other is from Arnhem in the Netherlands. read more here :https://www.theregister.co.uk/2020/01/17/weleakinfo_takedown_nca_fbi_operation/
  13. Hackers exploiting the high-profile Citrix CVE-2019-19781 flaw to compromise VPN gateways are now patching the servers to keep others out. Researchers at FireEye report finding a hacking group (dubbed NOTROBIN) that has been bundling mitigation code for NetScaler servers with its exploits. In effect, the hackers exploit the flaw to get access to the server, kill any existing malware, set up their own backdoor, then block off the vulnerable code from future exploit attempts by mitigation. Obviously, this is less of a noble gesture and more of a way to keep others out of the pwned boxes. "Upon gaining access to a vulnerable NetScaler device, this actor cleans up known malware and deploys NOTROBIN to block subsequent exploitation attempts," the FireEye team explained. "But all is not as it seems, as NOTROBIN maintains backdoor access for those who know a secret passphrase. FireEye believes that this actor may be quietly collecting access to NetScaler devices for a subsequent campaign." Read more Here: https://www.theregister.co.uk/2020/01/17/hackers_patch_citrix_vulnerability/
  14. This is something you should decide for yourself, this is work that you will do or should i say put into it. if love scripting then you have your answer.
  15. What is Malware? The word Malware is short for malicious software, and is a general term used to describe all of the viruses, worms, spyware, and pretty much anything that is specifically designed to cause harm to your PC or steal your information. Viruses Wreak Havoc On Your Files The term computer virus is often used interchangeably with malware, though the two don't actually have the same meaning. In the strictest sense, a virus is a program that copies itself and infects a PC, spreading from one file to another, and then from one PC to another when the files are copied or shared. Image by Joffley Most viruses attach themselves to executable files, but some can target a master boot record, autorun scripts, MS Office macros, or even in some cases, arbitrary files. Many of these viruses, like CIH, are designed to render your PC completely inoperable, while others simply delete or corrupt your files—the general point is that a virus is designed to cause havoc and break stuff. You can protect yourself from viruses by making certain your antivirus application is always updated with the latest definitions and avoiding suspicious looking files coming through email or otherwise. Pay special attention to the filename—if the file is supposed to be an mp3, and the name ends in .mp3.exe, you're dealing with a virus. Spyware Steals Your Information Spyware is any software installed on your PC that collects your information without your knowledge, and sends that information back to the creator so they can use your personal information in some nefarious way. This could include keylogging to learn your passwords, watching your searching habits, changing out your browser home and search pages, adding obnoxious browser toolbars, or just stealing your passwords and credit card numbers. Since spyware is primarily meant to make money at your expense, it doesn't usually kill your PC—in fact, many people have spyware running without even realizing it, but generally those that have one spyware application installed also have a dozen more. Once you've got that many pieces of software spying on you, your PC is going to become slow. What many people don't realize about spyware is that not every antivirus software is designed to catch spyware. You should check with the vendor to make sure the application you are using to protect you from malware is actually checking for spyware as well. If you come across a PC that is already heavily infected, run a combination of MalwareBytes and SuperAntiSpyware to clean it thoroughly. Scareware Holds Your PC for Ransom Scareware is a relatively new type of attack, where a user is tricked into downloading what appears to be an antivirus application, which then proceeds to tell you that your PC is infected with hundreds of viruses, and can only be cleaned if you pay for a full license. Of course, these scareware applications are nothing more than malware that hold your PC hostage until you pay the ransom—in most cases, you can't uninstall them or even use the PC. If you manage to come across a PC infected with one of these, your best bet is to Google the name of the virus and find specific instructions on how to remove it, but the steps are usually the same—run a combination of MalwareBytes, SuperAntiSpyware, and maybe ComboFix if you need to. For more on scareware, including a full walk-through of how a PC actually gets infected in the first place, check out the guide I wrote on removing Internet Security 2010 and other fake antivirus malware. Trojan Horses Install a Backdoor Trojan horses are applications that look like they are doing something innocuous, but secretly have malicious code that does something else. In many cases, trojans will create a backdoor that allows your PC to be remotely controlled, either directly or as part of a botnet—a network of computers also infected with a trojan or other malicious software. The major difference between a virus and a trojan is that trojans don't replicate themselves—they must be installed by an unwitting user. Image by otzberg Once your PC has been infected with the trojan, it can be used for any number of nefarious purposes, like a denial of service (DoS) attack against a web site, a proxy server for concealing attacks, or even worse—for sending out buckets of spam. Protection against trojans works the same way as viruses—make sure that your antivirus application is up to date, don't open suspicious attachments, and think long and hard before you try and use a downloaded crack for Photoshop—that's one of malware authors' favorite spots to hide a trojan. Worms Infect Through the Network Computer worms use the network to send copies of themselves to other PCs, usually utilizing a security hole to travel from one host to the next, often automatically without user intervention. Because they can spread so rapidly across a network, infecting every PC in their path, they tend to be the most well-known type of malware, although many users still mistakenly refer to them as viruses. Image by me and the sysop Some of the most famous worms include the ILOVEYOU worm, transmitted as an email attachment, which cost businesses upwards of 5.5 billion dollars in damage. The Code Red worm defaced 359,000 web sites, SQL Slammer slowed down the entire internet for a brief period of time, and the Blaster worm would force your PC to reboot repeatedly. Because worms often exploit a network vulnerability, they are the one type of malware that can be partially prevented by making sure your firewall is enabled and locked down—you'll still need an updated antivirus software, of course. Source LifeHacker

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