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  1. A new simple but dangerous strain of Android malware has been found in the wild that steals users' authentication cookies from the web browsing and other apps, including Chrome and Facebook, installed on the compromised devices.Dubbed "Cookiethief" by Kaspersky researchers, the Trojan works by acquiring superuser root rights on the target device, and subsequently, transfer stolen cookies to a remote command-and-control (C2) server operated by attackers."This abuse technique is possible not because of a vulnerability in the Facebook app or browser itself," Kaspersky researchers said. "Malware could steal cookie files of any website from other apps in the same way and achieve similar results."Cookiethief: Hijacking Accounts Without Requiring PasswordsCookies are small pieces of information that's often used by websites to differentiate one user from another, offer continuity around the web, track browsing sessions across different websites, serve personalized content, and strings related to targeted advertisements. Given how cookies on a device allow users to stay logged in to a service without having to repeatedly sign in, Cookiethief aims to exploit this very behavior to let attackers gain unauthorized access to the victim accounts without knowing their actual online accounts passwords."This way, a cybercriminal armed with a cookie can pass himself off as the unsuspecting victim and use the latter's account for personal gain," the researchers said.Kaspersky theorizes that there could be a number of ways the Trojan could land up on the device — including planting such malware in the device firmware before purchase, or by exploiting vulnerabilities in the operating system to download malicious applications.Once the device is infected, the malware connects to a backdoor, dubbed 'Bood,' installed on the same smartphone to execute "superuser" commands that facilitate cookie theft.How Do Attackers Bypass Multi-Level Protection Offered by Facebook?Cookiethief malware doesn't have it all easy, though. Facebook has security measures in place to block any suspicious login attempts, such as from IP addresses, devices, and browsers that had never been used for logging into the platform before. But the bad actors have worked around the problem by leveraging the second piece of malware app, named 'Youzicheng,' that creates a proxy server on the infected device to impersonate the account owner's geographic location to make the access requests legitimate."By combining these two attacks, cybercriminals can gain complete control over the victim's account and not raise suspicion from Facebook," the researchers noted.It's not yet clear what the attackers are really after, but the researchers found a page found on the C2 server advertising services for distributing spam on social networks and messengers — leading them to the conclusion that the criminals could leverage Cookiethief to hijack users' social media accounts to spread malicious links or perpetuate phishing attacks.While Kaspersky classified the attack as a new threat — with only about 1,000 individuals targeted in this manner — it warned that this number is "growing" considering the difficulty in detecting such intrusions.To be safe from such attacks, it's recommended that users block third-party cookies on the phone's browser, clear the cookies on a regular basis, and visit websites using private browsing mode.Have something to say about this article? Comment below or share it with us on Facebook, Twitter or our LinkedIn Group.
  2. Cybercriminals will stop at nothing to exploit every chance to prey on internet users. Even the disastrous spread of SARS-COV-II (the virus), which causes COVID-19 (the disease), is becoming an opportunity for them to likewise spread malware or launch cyber attacks. Reason Cybersecurity recently released a threat analysis report detailing a new attack that takes advantage of internet users' increased craving for information about the novel coronavirus that is wreaking havoc worldwide. The malware attack specifically aims to target those who are looking for cartographic presentations of the spread of COVID-19 on the Internet, and trickes them to download and run a malicious application that, on its front-end, shows a map loaded from a legit online source but in the background compromises the computer. New Threat With An Old Malware Component The latest threat, designed to steal information from unwitting victims, was first spotted by MalwareHunterTeam last week and has now been analyzed by Shai Alfasi, a cybersecurity researcher at Reason Labs. It involves a malware identified as AZORult, an information-stealing malicious software discovered in 2016. AZORult malware collects information stored in web browsers, particularly cookies, browsing histories, user IDs, passwords, and even cryptocurrency keys. read more here: https://thehackernews.com/2020/03/coronavirus-maps-covid-19.html
  3. It Is Your Choice I love bacon. Sometimes I eat it twice a day. It helps take my mind off the terrible chest pains I keep getting.
  4. My sister is marrying an organ thief. She says she wants a man after her own heart, someone who can de-liver her from her troubles, and who'll take care of her two little kidneys after she's gone.
  5. WhatsApp one of the largest instant messengers and considered by many a social network of its own. So, in continuing our app safety discussion, we’re diving into some of the top security hacks and questions many WhatsApp app users and parents may have. But first, what’s a security hack? In short, it’s an attempt to exploit the weaknesses in an app, network, or digital service to gain unauthorized access, usually for some illicit purpose. Here are just some of the concerns WhatsApp users may have and some suggestions on boosting security. WhatsApp Hack FAQAre WhatsApp conversations private? Yes — but there are exceptions. More than any other app, WhatsApp offers greater privacy thanks to end-to-end encryption that scrambles messages to ensure only you and the person you’re communicating with can read your messages or listen to your calls. Here’s the catch: WhatsApp messages (which include videos and photos) are vulnerable before they are encrypted and after they are decrypted if a hacker has managed to drop spyware on the phone. Spyware attacks on WhatsApp have already occurred. Safe Family Tip: No conversation shared between devices is ever 100% private. To increase your WhatsApp security, keep sensitive conversations and content offline, and keep your app updated.  Can anyone read my deleted WhatsApp messages? A WhatsApp user can access his or her own deleted messages via the chat backup function that automatically backs up all of your messages at 2 a.m. every day. WhatsApp users can delete a message by using the Delete for Everyone button within an hour after sending though it’s not foolproof. Here’s the catch: Anyone who receives the message before it’s deleted can take a screenshot of it. So, there’s no way to ensure regrettable content isn’t captured, archived, or shared. There are also third-party apps that will recall deleted messages shared by others. Another possibility is that a hacker can access old chats stored in an app user’s cloud. Safe Family Tip: Think carefully about sharing messages or content you may regret later. Can WhatsApp messages be deleted permanently? Even if a WhatsApp user decides to delete a message, it’s no guarantee of privacy since conversations are two-way, and the person on the receiving end may screenshot or save a copy of a chat, video, or photo. On the security side, you may delete a message and see it disappear, but WhatsApp still retains a “forensic trace of the chat” that can be used by hackers for mining data, according to reports. Safe Family Tip: For extra security, turn off backups in WhatsApp’s Settings. How can I secure my WhatsApp? It’s crucial when using WhatsApp (or any other app) to be aware of common scams, including malware, catfishing, job and money scams, spyware, and file jacking. To amplify security, turn on Security Notifications in Settings, which will send an alert if, for some reason, your security code changes. Other ways to boost security: Use two-step verification, never share your 6-digit SMS verification code, disable cloud back up, and set your profile to private. Safe Family Tip: Install comprehensive family security software and secure physical access to your phone or laptop with a facial, fingerprint, or a passcode ID. Don’t open (block, report) messages from strangers or spammers. Never share personal information with people you don’t know.  How do I delete my WhatsApp account from another phone? To delete a WhatsApp account go to > Settings > Account > Delete My Account. Deleting your account erases message history, removes you from groups, and deletes your backup data. According to WhatsApp, for users moving from one type of phone to another, such as from an iPhone to an Android, and keeping the same phone number, your account information stays intact, but you won’t be able to migrate messages across platforms. If you’re not keeping your number, you should delete WhatsApp from your old phone, download WhatsApp to your new phone, and verify your new phone number. Upgrading the same phone type will likely include options to migrate messages. Safe Family Tip: Before you give away or exchange an old phone, wipe it clean of all your data. How do you know your WhatsApp is scanned? WhatsApp users can easily sync devices by downloading the WhatsApp web app and activating it (Settings > WhatsApp Web/Desktop). Devices sync by scanning a QR code that appears on your laptop screen. You know your device is scanned when you see the green chat screen appear on your desktop. Safe Family Tip: It’s possible for a person with physical access to your desktop to scan your QR code and to gain account access. If you think someone has access to your account log out of all your active web sessions in WhatsApp on your mobile phone. How long are WhatsApp messages stored? According to WhatsApp, once a user’s messages are delivered, they are deleted from WhatsApp servers. This includes chats, photos, videos, voice messages, and files. Messages can still be stored on each individual’s device. Safe Family Tip: The moment you send any content online, it’s out of your control. The person or group on the receiving end can still store it on their device or to their cloud service. Never send risky content.  How secure is WhatsApp? There’s no doubt, end-to-end encryption makes it much more difficult for hackers to read WhatsApp messages. While WhatsApp is more secure than other messaging apps — but not 100% secure. Is it true that WhatsApp has been hacked? Yes. Several times and in various ways. No app, service, or network has proven to be unhackable. Safe Family Tip: Assume that any digital platform is vulnerable. Maximize privacy settings, never share risky content, financial information, or personal data. Is WhatsApp safe to send pictures? Encryption ensures that a transmission is secure, but that doesn’t mean WhatsApp content is safe or that human behavior is predictable. People (even trusted friends) can share private content. People can also illegally attempt to gain access to any content you’ve shared. This makes WhatsApp (along with other digital sharing channels) unsafe for exchanging sensitive information or photos. Safe Family Tip: Nothing on the internet is private. Never send or receive pictures that may jeopardize your privacy, reputation, or digital footprint. WhatsApp isn’t the only popular app with security loopholes hackers exploit. Every app or network connected to the internet is at risk for some type of cyberattack. We hope this post sparks family discussions that help your kids use this and other apps wisely and helps keep your family’s privacy and safety online top of min Source: https://www.mcafee.com/
  6. Google is not working with the US government in building a nationwide website to help people determine whether and how to get a novel coronavirus test, despite what President Donald Trump said in the course of issuing an emergency declaration for the coronavirus pandemic. Instead, a much smaller trial website made by another division of Alphabet, Google’s parent company, is going up. It will only be able to direct people to testing facilities in the Bay Area. More than an hour after Trump’s press conference, a Google communications Twitter account passed along the following statement from Verily, which is a different company inside the Alphabet corporate umbrella: Carolyn Wang, communications lead for Verily, told The Verge that the “triage website” was initially only going to be made available to health care workers instead of the general public. Now that it has been announced the way it was, however, anybody will be able to visit it, she said. But the tool will only be able to direct people to “pilot sites” for testing in the Bay Area, though Wang says Verily hopes to expand it beyond California “over time.” The triage site should be put live within a few days, and it will be hosted at Project Baseline, the Verily website where people can sign up to take part in clinical trials. That’s a seemingly odd place for the triage tool to live, but Wang says that Project Baseline already has certain necessary tools like an informed consent agreement, so it makes sense to put it there. “Google is going to develop a website — it’s going to be very quickly done, unlike websites of the past — to determine if a test is warranted and to facilitate testing at a nearby convenient location,” Trump said at the press conference. “We have many, many locations behind us, by the way. We cover this country and large parts of the world, by the way. We’re not gonna be talking about the world right now, but we cover very, very strongly our country. Stores in virtually every location. Google has 1,700 engineers working on this right now. They have made tremendous progress.” As for the 1,700 Google engineers Trump referenced in the press conference, that appears to be related to a call for volunteers Google and Alphabet CEO Sundar Pichai put out in a company-wide memo earlier this week. In all, the difference between the reality of what is being built and what was promised during the press conference is very large.
  7. Serious security vulnerabilities have been discovered in Avast’s Antitrack and AVG Antitrack tools. Exploiting the flaws could expose users to MiTM attacks whilst downgrading browsers’ security. Avast AntiTrack Certificate Vulnerability Reportedly, researcher David Eade found numerous security vulnerabilities in the Avast Antitrack tool. One of these is a vulnerability in certificate validation feature that could have allowed man-in-the-middle (MiTM) attacks. Elaborating his findings in a post, the researcher stated, Avast Antitrack does not check the validity of certificates presented by the end web server. This makes it trivial for a man-in-the-middle to serve a fake site using a self-signed certificate. An attacker could not only intercept the victim’s traffic but could also hijack live sessions by cloning cookies, thus bypassing two-factor authentication as well. Exploiting this bug required no user interaction, hence becoming entirely possible for a remote attacker. The researcher also noticed two other issues with the same tool. At first, it downgraded the browser’s security protocol to TLS 1.0. Then, the chosen cipher suites by the tool did not support Forward Secrecy. Patches Rolled Out The researcher found the said issues in the Avast Antitrack tool. However, since it shares codes with AVG Antitrack as well, the same vulnerabilities also applied to the latter. Specifically, the bugs affected all Avast Antitrack versions prior to 1.5.1.172, and AVG Antitrack versions below 2.0.0.178. Upon discovering the flaws in August 2019, the researcher contacted Avast to report the matter. After continued communication in the following months, the vendors eventually patched the flaws. At first, they released Avast Antitrack 1.5.1.172, and then AVG Antitrack 2.0.0.178 containing the patches. Avast has confirmed the existence and subsequent patching of the vulnerabilities whilst acknowledging the researcher in a separate advisory. As stated,Attribution link: https://latesthackingnews.com/2020/03/12/avast-antitrack-vulnerability-exposed-users-to-mitm-attacks/
  8. The Brno University Hospital in the city of Brno, Czech Republic, has been hit by a cyberattack right in the middle of a COVID-19 outbreak that is picking up steam in the small central European country. Hospital officials have not revealed the nature of the security breach; however, the incident was deemed severe enough to postpone urgent surgical interventions, and re-route new acute patients to nearby St. Anne's University Hospital, local media reported. The hospital was forced to shut down its entire IT network during the incident, and two other of the hospital's branches, the Children's Hospital and the Maternity Hospital, were also impacted. The infection took root at around 5 a.m. in the morning, local time, Peter Gramantik, a patient in the hospital at the time, and a security researcher with Sucuri told ZDNet via email today. "The hospital public announcement system started to repeat the message that all personnel should immediately shut down all computers due to 'cybernetic security'," Gramantik told us. "This message was repeated like every 30 minutes. "Around 8 a.m. there was another public announcement that all the surgeries are cancelled," Gramantik said, who was then sent home. source: www.zdnet.com
  9. A massive region in northern Italy that includes Milan and Venice is under government-ordered lockdown as officials struggle to contain the spread of the coronavirus, the New York Times reports. “We are facing an emergency,” Prime Minister Giuseppe Conte said Sunday in an early-morning press conference. The restrictions on travel throughout the region, which includes some 16 million people, are “very rigorous,” Conte added, but necessary. “This is the moment of self-responsibility,” he said. The lockdown of the northern Lombardy region and 11 neighboring provinces will restrict movement “in and out of the territory, and also within,” the affected area. People will need to seek special permissions to travel for work or medical reasons. The Times reports that under the restrictions, funerals and cultural events are banned, and people are required to keep a distance of at least one meter (about 3 feet) between each other at public places like supermarkets and churches. Anyone with a fever is being encouraged to stay home, and anyone who has tested positive for the coronavirus is required to do so. Anyone violating the lockdown could be subject to a fine or jail time, and police and soldiers will be enforcing the terms, the Times reports. Conte did not provide an end date for the measures when he spoke on Sunday, but an earlier report said a draft of the government decree indicated it would last until April 3rd. Italy has been hard-hit by the coronavirus outbreak, with 5,883 cases as of Saturday. The Wall Street Journal reports 233 people have died in Italy from COVID-19, the disease caused by the virus. The country has already restricted public events, and ordered schools closed. Late Saturday, the leader of Italy’s Democratic party Nicola Zingaretti said on Facebook that he had been infected with the coronavirus, which may suggest that the outbreak has spread beyond the country’s northern region.
  10. T-Mobile has once again made it to the news owing to a security incident. One more time, T-Mobile has suffered a data breach that exposed the personal and financial information of their customers. T-Mobile is presently notifying customers affected during this incident. T-Mobile Data Breach Reportedly, T-Mobile has once again suffered a data breach affecting numerous users. While it isn’t clear how many users were affected by the breach, the extent of information exposed during the incident sounds huge. Specifically, the incident happened as a result of a malicious attack against their email vendors. As a result, the attackers could gain access to T-mobile employee email accounts that included customers’ information. The news surfaced online after the service started notifying their customers about a ‘security event’ they recently ‘shut down’. Nonetheless, they have sent these notifications differently to every customer based on the extent of information exposed. For the customers who only suffered breach of personal details, the company directed them to the PII notice of the breach. In the case of these customers, the affected information included names, addresses, phone numbers, govt. ID numbers, Social Security numbers, billing and account details, rate plans and features, and financial account data. While, to some other users, the firm forwarded another security notice addressing the breach of account information. For such customers, the exposed data includes personal details such as names, contact numbers, addresses, account numbers, billing information, rate plans and features. Whereas, their Social Security numbers and financial information remained unaffected during the incident. What Next? Following the incident, the telecom giant began notifying affected customers. Though, they assured no misuse so far of the exposed details. For users receiving the PII breach notice, T-Mobile has offered free credit monitoring and identity theft services for two-years. However, for the other subset of the affected users, the firm hasn’t offered any such compensation. This isn’t the first time that the company has suffered a security incident. In 2018, they twice made it to the news owing to data breaches.Attribution link: https://latesthackingnews.com/2020/03/06/t-mobile-suffer-another-data-breach-affecting-personal-and-financial-data-of-customers/

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